The internet is a mysterious phenomenon in itself, especially when considering what occurs on the profound sections of the internet. Do regions of the internet, such as the dark web, actually exist or is it merely a myth? Under the circumstance it does, conceivably, prevail as more than just antics, then how do the illegal sales of drugs occur? To provide satisfaction for any curiosity, we invite you to read this article.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: gizmodo.com

The drug trafficking industry generates about half-a-trillion dollars annually through illegal manufacturing and selling, yet is it possible that the internet is a factor in the overall operation?1 Yes, and as a result, the distribution of narcotics in the dark section of cyberspace accounts for fourteen-to-eighty million dollars in the broad narcotics scandal. To comprehend how dealers can supply customers with drugs on the internet, of all places, one must understand how it functions altogether. The most effective approach consists of comparing the internet with the universe as the pair have corresponding configurations.

 

The universe and the internet, both entities composed of vast expanses of knowledge, require multiple means to observe the information—or interact with it. For instance, a person can peer into the sky during the night to observe the planet Venus. He or she can also use a browser application like Google Chrome to access Twitter. Venus is only one celestial object amongst potentially billions across the cosmos. Likewise, Twitter is another webpage alongside billions of others across the web. Venus and Twitter are similar because they are naturally observable in their respective domains. Hence, an individual can locate Venus without any telescopes, and find Twitter on the web by merely typing it into nearly any search engine. However, data observed without augmentation is only the bare surface of what humanity can uncover without issues.

 

When scouring further, an individual can use extraordinary tools to gaze into the obscurity of space in the universe and cyberspace on the internet. A curious scholar of astronomy may purchase a powerful telescope to see features of the Andromeda Galaxy hidden to the naked eye, while a tech-savvy fellow may use TOR, Tails, and overlapping VPNs on a new laptop to guarantee anonymity when purchasing compromised information (social security numbers, credit card info, etc.). What differentiates the purpose of glaring into the faint corners of the universe or the shady corners of cyberspace is the intention of the individual trying to approach the information. Generally, scientific analysis or self-amusement are the goals for exploring features around the universe. On the other hand, a person is seeking privacy when he or she uses the dark web, no matter if the confidentiality is for illicit or legitimate activities.

 

Therefore, criminals exploit cyberspace to secure their discretion while interacting with variables on the dark web. Drug trafficking is one of the numerous aspects of the dark web one can find when browsing. Drug dealers either establish a hidden webpage to sell their stock, or they list their items on a pseudo-black market with many other dealers.

 

Of course, law-enforcement agencies actively pursue the perpetrators on the dark web; unfortunately, it is troublesome as the culprits employ a variety of precautions to avoid the consequences. For example, cryptocurrencies are becoming a stable bartering item between narcotic suppliers and their customers, meaning law-enforcement agents cannot rely on money-trail evidence to resolve transgressions. Silk Road a former notorious black market on the dark corners of cyberspace, popularized the idea of using cryptocurrencies to improve anonymity for users and warrant fair transactions amongst dealers and customers. Most internet black markets use a corresponding trading format.

 

Still, the preventive measures these black markets undertake do not make it as if they are untouchable. Identical to any criminal, black market entrepreneurs, dealers, and customers have to respect the number one precept of being a crook, even if they are conducting business in cyberspace. Minimize the chance of failure and avoid suspicion from authorities, or suffer retribution administered by the law. According to officials in the United Kingdom, numerous dark web drug trafficking organizations are eliminating the circulation of fentanyl, a remarkably noxious opioid, because it has become too much of a risk to sell it. Indeed, a wise decision as fentanyl is now responsible for the most casualties in the opioid epidemic. The black markets that continue to sell fentanyl on the internet do have the added bonus of manipulating the market for the opioid since other organizations are deserting it but, they also present themselves as higher-threat to law-enforcement agencies, thereby attracting more trouble.

 

Whatever the case may be for the black markets lurking in cyberspace, they remain a menace to society and are accountable for contributing to the opioid epidemic troubling humanity currently. Want to read more about internet black markets shunning fentanyl? Then check out Gizmodo.

 

The Hayver group is seeking to repair the damage drug addiction can cause to an individual by releasing a cryptocurrency to contest drug use across the globe. The future is approaching closer by the moments, and Hayver is trying to make it a future where hopefully no one will ever bear agony from substance abuse ever again. For more information, contact info(at)hayver.com.